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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas found in the catalog.

Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas

Elizabeth S. Morrissey

Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas

by Elizabeth S. Morrissey

  • 217 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rural poor -- Employment -- United States.,
  • Urban poor -- Employment -- United States.,
  • Unemployment -- United States.,
  • Manpower policy, Rural -- United States.,
  • Metropolitan areas -- United States.,
  • Labor market -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementElizabeth S. Morrissey.
    SeriesRural development research report -- 81., Rural development research report -- no. 81.
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationv, 19 p.
    Number of Pages19
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17749705M

      The metro/nonmetro status of some counties changed in , , , and CPS poverty status is based on family income in the past 12 months, and ACS poverty status is based on family income in the prior calendar year. The metro/nonmetro pattern of opioid prescribing was different from that of other health indicators such as smoking, cerebrovascular disease, and mortality which follow different patterns, suggesting a distinctive mechanism for the emergence of the problem, which justifies future research. 28 The results stand in contrast with related studies.

      The descriptive statistics and t-tests for differences in means provided in Table 1 confirm that a number of socioeconomic indicators have more severe values for nonmetro areas, including poverty, unemployment, working poor, high school dropouts, income inequality, and low hour work. Notably, retail work and service work are more widespread in. Characteristics of poverty in nonmetro counties (OCoLC) Microfiche version: Morrissey, Elizabeth S. Characteristics of poverty in nonmetro counties (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth S Morrissey; United States. Department of.

    This analysis extends prior research on labor market conditions and violent crime. Specifically, we elaborate on research demonstrating a link between poor labor market conditions and violence by directly measuring the associations between secondary sector work, low hour work, low pay work, and levels of violence across the metro–nonmetro divide. Long-term poverty rates among nonmetro Blacks have fallen dramatically since the early s. Associated with that improvement are higher levels of education among young adults and smaller family size. Despite improvements, poverty levels are still much higher for Blacks than for Whites in both metro and nonmetro areas. (Author/KS).


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Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas by Elizabeth S. Morrissey Download PDF EPUB FB2

Work and Poverty in Metro and Nonmetro Areas. By Elizabeth S. Morrissey. Agriculture and Rural Economy Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Rural Development Research Report No. Abstract Inworker poverty rates were 10 percent in nonmetro areas compared with percent in metro areas.

Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas (OCoLC) Online version: Morrissey, Elizabeth S. Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth S Morrissey; United States.

Department of Agriculture. Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas (OCoLC) Microfiche version: Morrissey, Elizabeth S. Work and poverty in metro and nonmetro areas (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors.

Working Poverty across the Metro-Nonmetro Divide — Slack helping tie together substantive strands in the field, introducing new conceptual perspectives and methodologies, and by speaking to ques- tions of uneven development by drawing out how territorial inequality is.

residing in nonmetro compared with metro areas, controlling for individual/family characteristics and, in a few analyses, local context variables (see Weber et al. forthcoming, for a review). Why is poverty higher in rural than urban areas. One view, the “structural condition hypothesis,” ascribes a causal role to place of residence.

This study draws on these ideas by examining the relationship between work and poverty poverty Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details in the United States with an explicit comparative focus on metropolitan (metro) and nonmetropolitan (nonmetro) areas. Moreover, this study joins space with its counterpart time by exploring how this.

Nonmetro areas have substantially higher poverty rates than metro areas. Poverty is also regionally based: the two poorest regions in the United States are the Mississippi Delta and the Texas.

The nonmetro/metro poverty rate gap for the South has historically been the largest. Inthe South had a nonmetro poverty rate of percent—nearly 6 percentage points higher than in the region's metro areas.

Regional poverty rates for nonmetro and metro areas were most alike in the Midwest and the Northeast in Downloadable. Poverty rates are highest in the most urban and most rural areas of the United States, and are higher in non-metropolitan (nonmetro) than metropolitan (metro) areas, yet rural poverty remains relatively obscured from mainstream political and popular attention.

This fact has motivated considerable research by rural social scientists on the relationship between poverty and place. Specifically, this paper assesses changing differentials in the proportion of poor people who are working; documents the rapid rise in poverty among nonmetro and metropolitan (metro) workers.

in terms of poverty research. The metro/nonmetro classification uses a county geography that is often too coarse, A seminal work in this genre, although not the first of its kind, is Fitchen’s () location in relation to metro areas—adjacent to a large metro area, adjacent to a small metro area, and not adjacent to a metro area.

Racial differences in poverty rates are large, a phenomenon noted in many previous studies. Blacks are the largest racial group in the persistent poverty category, representing % in metro areas and % in nonmetro areas.

In the transitory poverty category, the majority are Caucasians, % in metro areas and % in nonmetro areas. This study draws on these ideas by examining the relationship between work and poverty in the United States with an explicit comparative focus on metropolitan (metro) and nonmetropolitan (nonmetro.

This study draws on these ideas by examining the relationship between work and poverty in the United States with an explicit comparative focus on metropolitan (metro) and nonmetropolitan (nonmetro) areas. Moreover, this study joins space with its counterpart time by exploring how this relationship has changed over the last quarter century.

Poverty rates are highest in the most urban and most rural areas of the United States, and are higher in non-metropolitan (nonmetro) than metropolitan (metro) areas, yet rural poverty remains relatively obscured from mainstream political and popular attention.

This fact has motivated considerable research by rural social scientists on the relationship between poverty and place generally, and.

Nonmetro and metro poverty rates differ substantially across U.S. regions. In the Midwest, nonmetro and metro poverty rates differ by less than 1 percentage point. On the other hand, nonmetro poverty is more than 5 percentage points higher than metro poverty in the South, where more than 40 percent of the U.S.

nonmetro population live. One in 10 African Americans lives in a nonmetro area. 17 Smaller counties that are adjacent to metro areas have, on average, as high a share of African American residents as medium and small metro.

Figure 2. Rates of college completion have increased for women and men in urban areas, for women in rural areas, but not for rural men. Source: The Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) of the Current Population Survey (CPS) for calendar years – Race, ethnicity, and place affect poverty differently in rural vs.

urban areas. Alton Thompson & Donald McDowell, "Determinants of poverty among workers in metro and nonmetro areas of the south," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol.

22(4), pagesJune. Glaeser, Edward L & Mare, David C, Poverty rates among all citizens are highest in the extremely urban and truly rural areas of the United States. However, poverty rates, as measured by the Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, are higher in non-metro areas as compared to metropolitan centers.

the differences among nonmetro areas and categorize nonmetro counties by degree of urbanization and adjacency to metro areas. The poverty rate is the highest in the completely rural counties (not adjacent to metro counties), with percent of the population poor.

The poverty rate in the largest metro areas is the lowest, with percent of the. Under the official measure, poverty is much higher in non-metro areas than in metro areas. But under the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), which accounts for most government benefits and adjusts for local cost-of-living differences, the poverty rate is actually lower in non-metro areas ( percent) than in metro areas (nonmetro ”] [20 million Americans living in nonmetro poverty (including nonmetro population living in cities of more than people) = 60 % of U.S.

poor. There were an additional million nonmetro poor in small cities of or more (with a poverty rate of .